Richard Weers

(1932 - present)

Biography

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Richard Weers

See Artist's Artwork











I enjoy painting - taking the visual reality of the world and translating it into a new reality of light and shadow, with bold and subtle colors of paint on a canvas. It's an exciting feeling to face the challenge of each new painting. Solving the problems, interpreting an idea into shapes and colors, and letting my subject emerge from the shadow into the light is always a rewarding experience. This "chiaroscuro" approach lets the light flow through my painting creating a quiet drama. My goal is to take form and color, and selectively use them to create something beautiful. Still life subjects provide me the freedom to be completely creative in presenting my subject.The subject may draw your interest, but hopefully it is the artistic presentation that holds your attention.

Richard Weers paints captivating contrasts. Whether it be the softness of light as it falls against a rough woven rug, or the hushed glow of a beaded necklace opposite a shiny brass vase, or simply light versus shadow, his still-lives invite the viewer to reach into the painting to touch the objects within.

For Weers, how he paints his subject matter is more important than what he paints, He chooses an abstract idea for a painting – like light, texture or mood – and lets the idea create its own subjects.

Richard travels extensively with his wife Gloria in pursuit of artifacts for his classic still lives. The realism of his subjects may prompt the viewer to reach out to touch the painting and those elements of substance and form are part of the charm of his paintings. A samovar or pair of moccasins from the past or fresh-cut flowers from the present may attract one’s initial attention, but the artistic composition and treatment will further captivate the viewer.

“I enjoy painting – taking the visual reality of the world and translating it into a new reality of light and shadow, with bold and subtle colors of paint on a canvas. It’s an exciting feeling to face the challenge of each new painting. Solving the problems, interpreting an idea into shapes and colors, and letting my subject emerge from the shadow into the light is always a rewarding experience.”